Featured Stories

A&S Celebrates New Hall of Fame Members

The University of Kentucky College of Arts Sciences Hall of Fame induction and festivities are slated for Friday, Oct. 10, at 3:30 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the UK Singletary Center for the Arts.

Long Time Ago... A Performance by Crit Callebs Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

 
Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.
 
Date: 
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
The Niles Gallery -- Lucille Fine Arts Library

"Sleepless Nights/Wasted Time: Seeking Islam in Egypt's Hollywood"

Professor Joel Gordon will explore the depiction of ‘normative’ religious practices and personal expressions of religious identity in recent Egyptian movies with a particular focus is on Egyptian youth.  Whereas in the past signs of piety had been restricted to either ‘traditional’ Egyptians – often in comic fashion – or political extremists, a few recent films have dared to depict ‘normal’ veiled women and bearded men and even a social environment in which questions of piety, morality and proper behavior dominate the discussions, concerns and conflicts between young Egyptians.  These films may point to a growing willingness by film artists to honestly explore social trends that have been taboo, especially as Egypt enters a new political era.

Prof. Joel Gordon: Professor of History and Director of Middle East Studies, University of Arkansas; Specialist in modern Egyptian history and Arab popular culture; Author of Nasser' Blessed Movement, Revolutionary Melodrama, and Nasser: Hero of the Arab Nation

 
Date: 
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
UKAA Auditorium @ WT Young Library

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